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[/vc_column_text][vc_accordion collapsible= »yes » disable_keyboard= » » active_tab= »false »][vc_accordion_tab title= »Course segment I – The history of the European Union »][vc_column_text]

In this segment, we discuss the history of the European Union. We take a look at the circumstances existing at the time of its creation and the other competing pan-national bodies that were established in competition with it. We chart the development of organization from the initial attempts at cooperation to the 28 member state organization that exists today.

Aim: After completing this segment, the student will be better able to understand the legal vocabulary describing the place of the European Union and the nature of its role today in uniting its twenty-eight member states.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_accordion_tab][vc_accordion_tab title= »Course segment 2 – A closer look at the treaties creating the European Union »][vc_column_text]

In this Course segment we look at the different treaties making up the European Union beginning with the Coal and Steel Treaty of 1952 and ending with the Lisbon Treaty of 2009. We of course look at the different treaties signed in between and seek to explain the legal framework on which the European Union is based

Aim: The role of this course segment is to introduce the student to the legal vocabulary necessary to describe the foundations of the European Union and to the English vocabulary necessary to work in this area.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_accordion_tab][vc_accordion_tab title= »Course segment 3 – The institutions of the European Union »][vc_column_text]

In this Course segment we take our first look at the institutional structure of the European Union and in particular its main legislative organs. Thus, we study the Council of the European Union and the European Parliament, which institutions together represent the two-tier legislative structure of the European Union. We also take a look at the European Council, made up of the 28 Heads of State.

Aim: Thus the student will acquire not only a better understanding of the main legislative institutions at the heart of the European Union but will also develop a better understanding of the relationship between each of these institutions and will begin to understand the vocabulary necessary for this area.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_accordion_tab][vc_accordion_tab title= »Course segment 4 – The institutions of the European Union »][vc_column_text]

Having looked at the legislative institutions making up the European Union in Course segment 3, in Course segment 4 we continue to study the EU institutional structure and look at its executive and judicial bodies, namely the European Commission and the Court of Justice of the European Union. We also consider the role of its secondary institutional organs.

Aim: As with Course segment 3, the role of this Course segment is to improve students understanding of the institutional structure making-up the European Union and the vocabulary necessary to be able to work through English in this area.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_accordion_tab][vc_accordion_tab title= »Course segment 5 – The sources of EU law »][vc_column_text]

The role of this Course segment is to explain the different sources of EU law and the relationship between the different member state social models. We look at the different types of EU legislative instruments such as regulations, directives and recommendations.

Aim: For students working with or hoping to work in the area of EU law through English it is vital that they have a knowledge of the nature and character of EU law and how the EU expresses itself as a legislative body.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_accordion_tab][vc_accordion_tab title= »Course segment 6 – The Internal Market »][vc_column_text]

Course Segment Six seeks to explain the notion of the EU internal market. It looks at the scope of the market and its sectoral approach extending to the areas of goods, workers, services and capital. We also take a look at the principles underlining the creation of the EU internal market and the role played by mutual recognition and harmonization.

Aim: Thus, the student will begin to understand the nature of the EU internal market and the basic vocabulary necessary to be able to work in this area.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_accordion_tab][vc_accordion_tab title= »Course segment 7 – Free movement of goods »][vc_column_text]

In this Course segments we take a closer look at the area of free movement of goods and the vocabulary applicable to this area. We run through the case law that defines the scope of this freedom and the principles governing free movement of goods in the EU today.

Aim: The Course segment introduces the student to the legal vocabulary used in the area of free movement of goods and explains in a clear and succinct manner the law governing this field.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_accordion_tab][vc_accordion_tab title= »Course segment 8 – Competition law in the European Union »][vc_column_text]

This is the first of three Course segments dealing with the area of competition law. This segment deals with the basic principles of competition law and the scope of EU competition law in the areas of restrictive agreements, abuse of dominance, state aid and concentrations/mergers.

Aim: The Course Segment provides the student with the legal vocabulary associated with competition law and explains in a clear and comprehensive manner the technical vocabulary relied on in this area.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_accordion_tab][vc_accordion_tab title= »Course segment 9 – Competition law – article 101″][vc_column_text]

One of the principle pillars of EU competition law centers on the control of restrictive agreements. This Course segment focuses on this area discussing the scope of EU Commission competition control and the manner in which its jurisdiction is exercised.

Aim: In learning about the control of restrictive agreements in the European Union, the student is introduced to the technical legal vocabulary relied on in this area of law.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_accordion_tab][vc_accordion_tab title= »Course segment 10 – Article 102 and merger control »][vc_column_text]

In this last Course segment dedicated to the area of competition law practice we look at the area of monopolization and the role of merger control.

Aim: Along with the other two Course segments, this segment is essential for lawyers/students wishing to specialize in the area of competition law or wishing to represent clients acting in this area.

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